Month: October 2018

Yeasted Pumpkin Bread Recipe | Serious Eats

Yeasted Pumpkin Bread Recipe | Serious Eats

1. Making the Dough: In the bowl of a food processor, pulse the bread flour, salt, and instant yeast together to combine. Add pumpkin purée, maple syrup, and melted butter (or oil), and process until the dough comes together in a smooth, pliable ball; the […]

A Pumpkin Bread Made for Sandwiches, Not Dessert

A Pumpkin Bread Made for Sandwiches, Not Dessert

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik. Video: Serious Eats Video.] More Sandwiches Tips and tricks for making the best sandwiches at home. I know some of you may be confused by the idea of this pumpkin bread. The phrase “pumpkin bread” itself suggests a cousin of banana bread, […]

How to Pair IPAs and Other Hoppy, Bitter Beers With Food

How to Pair IPAs and Other Hoppy, Bitter Beers With Food


An IPA beer paired with fried pork cutlets and slaw

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik]

Editor’s Note: Welcome back to our series on beer pairings, in which Michael Harlan Turkell, coauthor of The Beer Pantry, will walk us through six different beer flavor profiles and the foods that go best with them. Read our first post in the series, on crisp and clean beers, for guidance on pairing food with amber lagers, pilsners, kölsch, and more.

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Over the past decade or two, IPAs have become among the most popular craft beer styles in the US, representing 25% of all craft beer sales. Marked by a generous addition of hops, which balance out the malty base, IPAs pair well with a wide array of spices and flavors, making them a great way to expand your palate for both beer and food simultaneously.

IPAs aren’t the only beers that belong in the hoppy and bitter category, which includes amber ales, barley wines, ESBs (Extra Special Bitters), and pale ales. But these styles all began with British colonizers in the 1700s, who fortified their beer with hops and higher alcohol content to make it more shelf-stable for the long journey to India, giving birth to the first of the so-called India pale ales, or IPAs.

The large quantities of hops that you’ll find in IPAs make them undeniably bitter, with some rating over 100 IBUs (International Bitterness Units), which is beyond what humans can perceive. But not all beers in this category are so crazily hopped as IPAs. For example, ESBs, despite their full name, are actually much less bitter than, say, pale ales. In barley wine—which is in fact a beer, and a strong one at that, with typically twice the alcohol of an average brew—the bitterness of hops, though noticeable, is tempered by the high ABV. Amber ales (which are simply pale ales with a more caramelly flavor profile, and not to be confused with American amber lagers) tend to be lower on the bitterness scale because they’re well balanced with malts.

Among IPAs, too, there’s plenty of variation: Trendy, juicy New England IPAs, characterized by prominent aromas of stone fruit, citrus, and melon, are hop-forward but not all that bitter. Milkshake IPAs have light and bright hops, low bitterness, and a creamy mouthful due to the addition of lactose (milk sugars) for a more full-bodied beer. It’s worth remembering that hops are also seasonal—with any beer, the level of bitterness, as well as its overall flavor profile, will be affected by not only the variety of hops used but the unique qualities of each season’s hop harvest.

The common thread among this wide range of hoppy and bitter beers is their ability to cleanse the palate. They wash away whatever was there before, eliminating lingering flavors and resetting your taste buds for the next bite.

pouring an IPA beer into a glass

IPAs saw a resurgence in the US in the 1970s, after a period of lapsed popularity following Prohibition. That’s around the same time that California cuisine got its start, and when terms like “farm-to-table” and “fusion cooking” were introduced to our collective vocabulary. Bitter lettuces started replacing iceberg on salad plates in home kitchens, and more assertive flavors, like cumin and chili peppers, found their way onto our dining tables. Strong cheeses, like Gruyère and blues, began showing up among what had been a fairly bland selection of processed orange cheese available in the States. And, indeed, IPAs and other beers in the hoppy and bitter category are well suited to complement these bolder flavors and richer tastes.

The bitterness of hops is excellent at counterbalancing spices and spicy food. Hoppy and bitter beers are also great when paired with mouth-coating fats: They’re made to cut through cream sauces, cheese, fried foods, and bacon, preparing you to enjoy another bite of your BLT or wings. And they help tone down sugars in earthier ingredients, like sweet potatoes and carrots, while still highlighting their most intrinsic qualities—in essence, making a carrot taste more like a carrot.

A graphic of a colored wheel showing the food categories that pair best with hoppy and bitter beers

Overall, hoppy and bitter beers can take some competition on the palate; rather than fighting strong opposing flavors, they amplify the subtleties of both the food and the beer. That’s why they work so well with French fries dipped in aioli, allowing you to taste equally the humble potato and the garlicky mayonnaise.

When pairing food with a really hoppy beer, one strategy is to learn more about the flavors of the hops and introduce similar flavors into your food. A beer heavy on Cascade hops will be citrusy, while Centennial, Chinook, and Amarillo hops tend more toward pineapple (though not tropical, like Nelson Sauvin). Simcoe hops taste unmistakably of pine sap, making them a natural companion for root vegetables, fattier game meats, and other foods that bring fall to mind. Of course, many brews incorporate multiple varieties of hops, producing more idiosyncratic flavor profiles.

In hopes of identifying the ideal dish to pair with a hoppy and bitter beer, I called my Beer Pantry coauthor, Adam Dulye. To highlight this beer category, our book includes recipes ranging from a green salad with goat cheese croquettes to a braised pork shoulder in adobo and even a classic carrot cake with a creamy frosting. What single cookable recipe could adequately represent all of the flavors that hoppy and bitter beers play well with?

Breaded pork cutlet with slaw overhead view

For inspiration, we decided to look to Viennese schnitzel—a lean piece of meat, typically veal, that’s pounded until tender and thin, then breaded and fried. But we swapped out the veal for pork, both because it’s more accessible and because it allows you to choose from a range of quality and cuts. Instead of marinated cucumber salad on the side, Adam devised a spicy take on mayo-free coleslaw.

The resulting meal incorporates many of the most prominent tastes and textures that go well with these beers: fried, spicy, and creamy. The flavors are big, to match the boldness of the beers, and every mouthful hits all the right notes—the perfect ratio of breading to tender meat in the schnitzel, and just enough heat in the coleslaw to cut through its creaminess. Each sip of beer will ready you for the next wallop of a bite.

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Coleslaw With Creamy Chili Vinaigrette Recipe

Coleslaw With Creamy Chili Vinaigrette Recipe

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik] This simple and refreshing coleslaw balances the sweet, floral heat of Fresno chili in a tangy and creamy vinaigrette. The most time-consuming step of the recipe—letting the coleslaw wilt after it’s mixed with the dressing—is completely hands-off, giving you time to prepare […]

Pork Schnitzel (Breaded and Fried Pork Cutlet) Recipe

Pork Schnitzel (Breaded and Fried Pork Cutlet) Recipe

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik] For hearty, down-to-earth fare to enjoy between sips of beer, you can’t do much better than schnitzel, a breaded and fried cutlet that’s traditionally big enough to overhang the sides of a plate. Though classic Viennese schnitzel is made with thinly pounded […]

12 Lasagna Recipes, From Meaty Bolognese to Vegan Variations

12 Lasagna Recipes, From Meaty Bolognese to Vegan Variations


[Photographs: J. Kenji López-Alt, Vicky Wasik]

I’m not usually one to pick lasagna over other pasta dishes, but as the weather starts to cool off I can’t deny the comfort that can be found in this hearty mix of tender noodles and rich sauce. This winter I’m vowing to give lasagna the respect it deserves and I plan on making it in all of its delicious forms. We’ve rounded up 12 of our favorite lasagna recipes, from meaty lasagna Napoletana and the ultimate spinach lasagna to vegan takes on lasagna alla Bolognese and Italian-American lasagna. If it’s still warm where you live, we’ve even got a couple summery varieties for you.

A couple notes: many of our lasagna recipes call for ricotta, and store-bought ricotta is almost universally terrible. Your best bet is to use cottage cheese or whip up some homemade ricotta, which is actually really easy. Additionally, leftover lasagna can lose some of its most appealing qualities when it’s reheated—the contrast between tender but firm pasta and the creamy sauce, for one—but you can jazz up your leftovers by slicing your lasagna into thin slabs and frying the slices up in a skillet until crispy on the outside and gooey on the inside.

Meaty

Classic Baked Lasagna Bolognese (Lasagne alla Bolognese)

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Rather than the thick layers of ricotta and mozzarella typical in an Italian-American lasagna, lasagna alla Bolognese is made with slow-cooked meat sauce, creamy béchamel, and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. To make an especially traditional lasagna alla Bolognese, try using spinach pasta instead of plain egg noodles.

Classic Baked Lasagna Bolognese (Lasagne alla Bolognese) Recipe »

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No-Holds-Barred Lasagna Bolognese

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

This lasagna walks the line between a traditional lasagna alla Bolognese and an Italian-American version—we keep the ragù and béchamel, but melt some mozzarella into the béchamel and also layer in fresh ricotta. To up the umami we turn to an ingredient that you don’t usually find in any version of lasagna: Asian fish sauce.

No-Holds-Barred Lasagna Bolognese Recipe »

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Lasagna Napoletana (Lasagna With Sausage, Smoked Cheese, and Meatballs)

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Lasagna Bolognese isn’t the only game in town. Move south to Naples and you will find this decadent lasagna made with red sauce, small meatballs, slices of sausage, and four different types of cheese. Unlike our ragú Bolognese, which is made with either all beef or a mixture of beef, pork, and veal, we make our ragú Napoletana with just pork ribs.

Lasagna Napoletana (Lasagna With Sausage, Smoked Cheese, and Meatballs) Recipe »

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Eggplant, Gruyère and Prosciutto Lasagna

[Photograph: Jennifer Olvera]

Here in Los Angeles it’s finally starting to feel like summer is fading into fall, and this recipe bridges the seasons with a garlicky mixture of eggplant, carrot, onion, and prosciutto. Since we’re already throwing tradition to the wind, we make the lasagna with a mixture of mozzarella and Gruyère to give it a slight nutty flavor.

Eggplant, Gruyère and Prosciutto Lasagna Recipe »

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Vegetarian

The Best Spinach Lasagna

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

We want our spinach lasagna to be as spinach-y as possible. To achieve this we sauté the spinach (rather than blanching or microwaving it) for the best flavor and chop it finely in the food processor so that it ends up in every bite. Be sure to drain your spinach thoroughly before chopping it—no one wants a waterlogged lasagna.

The Best Spinach Lasagna Recipe »

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Ultra-Creamy Spinach and Mushroom Lasagna

If you’re looking for a vegetarian lasagna but miss the heartiness of a meat sauce, try this version that pairs the spinach with rich mushroom duxelles. We melt some grated mozzarella and Parmesan into the bèchamel to make the sauce extra creamy.

Ultra-Creamy Spinach and Mushroom Lasagna Recipe »

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Creamy Brussels Sprouts and Mushroom Lasagna

We use mushroom duxelles in this lasagna, too, pairing the mushrooms with creamed Brussels sprouts. While you can slice the sprouts by hand, we prefer to use a food processor because finer shredding means the sprouts will both brown better and break down into the sauce more completely. Lest you hear Brussels sprouts and mushrooms and think this is health food, we also layer in plenty of cheesy béchamel.

Creamy Brussels Sprouts and Mushroom Lasagna Recipe »

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Summer Vegetable Lasagna With Zucchini, Squash, Eggplant, and Tomato

If you just layer fresh eggplant, summer squash, and zucchini into a lasagna, you’re going to end up with something closer to a soup than a casserole. Summer lasagna is all about moisture control, so we sauté the vegetables before assembly, which drives out excess moisture and intensifies the flavor of the veggies. Finishing with fresh basil adds a final summery touch.

Summer Vegetable Lasagna With Zucchini, Squash, Eggplant, and Tomato Recipe »

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The Best Squash Lasagna

Moving from summer to fall, this lasagna is made with the autumnal flavors of squash and sage. We incorporate the squash two ways: roasted and puréed with cream cheese, nutmeg, and cinnamon and sautéed with apples and sage. We layer both squash preparations with a Gruyère béchamel, though you could also use Fontina or low-moisture mozzarella in the sauce.

The Best Squash Lasagna Recipe »

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Vegan Lasagna alla Bolognese

Lasagna alla Bolognese isn’t the easiest dish to make vegan given that its three main components—egg noodles, ragù, and béchamel—all contain animal products. The noodles are easy—you can get perfectly good lasagna noodles that are made with just flour and water. The other two ingredients are trickier—we use a vegan ragù made with mushrooms and seitan and a béchamel made with coconut oil, flour, and almond milk.

Vegan Lasagna alla Bolognese Recipe »

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Vegan Italian-American Lasagna With “Ricotta”

Italian-American lasagna is even harder to veganize than lasagna alla Bolognese because it’s made with several types of cheese. Mozzarella is hard to imitate, so we just replace it with vegan béchamel. As for the ricotta, we mimic its mild creaminess and slightly grainy texture by blending firm tofu into a cauliflower purée.

Vegan Italian-American Lasagna With “Ricotta” Recipe »

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Polenta Lasagna With Mushroom Ragù (Polenta Pasticciata)

If you think lasagna has to be made with noodles, think again. Polenta pasticciata is an Italian dish that translates to “messed-up polenta” and is basically polenta lasagna. To make it all you need to do is layer polenta with ragù and Parmesan cream. We use our vegan mushroom ragù here, but ragù Bolognese works just as well.

Polenta Lasagna With Mushroom Ragù (Polenta Pasticciata) Recipe »

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This post may contain links to Amazon or other partners; your purchases via these links can benefit Serious Eats. Read more about our affiliate linking policy.



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How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds

How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik] So you’ve picked out your pumpkin, you’ve followed one of our awesome guides to beginning or advanced pumpkin-carving, and now you’ve got a bowl full of seeds and pumpkin guts. Now what? If you’re me, you make your excuses, pretend that there’s […]

Wild Rice Salad for Thanksgiving, Two Ways

Wild Rice Salad for Thanksgiving, Two Ways

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik] I’m always a little bit perplexed when people write about wild rice. Most articles make a point of stressing that wild rice is not a rice at all, but instead the grain of an aquatic grass. They’re right that wild rice isn’t […]

Wild Rice Salad With Mushrooms, Celery Root, and Pine Nuts Recipe

Wild Rice Salad With Mushrooms, Celery Root, and Pine Nuts Recipe


[Photographs: Vicky Wasik]

Wild rice, an earthy grain native to the Americas, gets an earthy treatment in this easy salad with sautéed mushrooms, celery root, and toasted pine nuts. An optional dose of dried mushrooms and stock for cooking the rice adds even more savory depth to the salad, perfect for an autumnal Thanksgiving table.



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Wild Rice Salad With Dried Cranberries, Pickled Apples, and Pecans

Wild Rice Salad With Dried Cranberries, Pickled Apples, and Pecans

Whether you call it a salad, a dressing, or a stuffing, this wild rice side dish studded with plump cranberries and tart pickled apples is a perfect addition to the Thanksgiving table. Get Recipe! Source link