24 Savory Rosh Hashanah Recipes, Because It Ain’t All Apples and Honey

24 Savory Rosh Hashanah Recipes, Because It Ain’t All Apples and Honey


collage of recipes for rosh hashanah

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik, Daniel Gritzer]

Rosh Hashanah isn’t necessarily a time for culinary innovation—your family has probably been eating the same things for years. But food is a huge part of the holiday, so it’s worth putting some thought into what you make. That could be as simple as a truly moist and tender braised brisket (yes, it’s possible!) or a loaf of eggy homemade challah, but you could also try to mix things up—think smoked brisket rather than braised, Tuscan-Jewish fried chicken, or matzo ball soup with a Mexican twist. However you like to eat on the Jewish New Year, we’ve got you covered.

Rosh Hashanah Main Dishes

Crown Roast of Lamb With Couscous Stuffing and Pistachio-Mint Sauce

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Lamb is a classic Rosh Hashanah centerpiece, and the most impressive centerpiece is undeniably a crown roast. The roast’s shape makes it easy to overcook, though—the best way to get it right is to start it low, then finish it high to brown it, a technique otherwise known as the reverse sear. Serving some sort of stuffing in the roast is a good idea, but be sure to cook it separately so that everything heats up to the proper degree.

Crown Roast of Lamb With Couscous Stuffing and Pistachio-Mint Sauce Recipe »

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Sous Vide Leg of Lamb With Mint, Cumin, and Black Mustard

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

While we typically cook meat on the bone when possible, a fatty leg of lamb is better deboned, butterflied, and rolled with flavorful ingredients. In this case, we stuff the lamb with black mustard and cumin and top it with a chimichurri made with both of those ingredients, plus mint and cilantro. Cooking the lamb sous vide virtually guarantees that it will come out perfect.

Sous Vide Leg of Lamb With Mint, Cumin, and Black Mustard Recipe »

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Slow-Roasted Boneless Leg of Lamb With Garlic, Rosemary, and Lemon

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

A sous vide circulator makes cooking a leg of lamb pretty much foolproof, but you can also get great results with the same reverse-sear technique that we use for a crown roast. As with the previous recipe, here we stuff the lamb before cooking—in this case, with garlic, shallot, anchovies, rosemary, lemon zest, and red pepper flakes.

Slow-Roasted Boneless Leg of Lamb With Garlic, Rosemary, and Lemon Recipe »

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Grilled Berbere-Spiced Lamb Chops With Cucumber-Lentil Salad

[Photograph: Daniel Gritzer]

These lamb chops get an East African twist from berbere, an Ethiopian spice blend typically made with ingredients like chili powder, cardamom, and fenugreek. The spice blend gives the chops a bit of a kick; for balance, we pair them with a lentil salad flavored with cooling cucumber and mint.

Grilled Berbere-Spiced Lamb Chops With Cucumber-Lentil Salad Recipe »

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Jewish-Style Braised Brisket With Onions and Carrots

[Photograph: Daniel Gritzer]

You’ve probably eaten brisket at many Rosh Hashanah dinners, and most of those briskets have probably been poorly cooked. The lean cut of meat tends to dry out when cooked until tender. Our solution is to braise it in a roasting pan tightly sealed with aluminum foil, then slice it and return it to the braising liquid to maximize its juiciness.

Jewish-Style Braised Brisket With Onions and Carrots Recipe »

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Braised Brisket in Apricot and Cranberry Sauce

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Another trick to brisket is to buy the right cut—the fattier brisket point has more flavor and moisture than the leaner flat. Since Rosh Hashanah is a time to eat sweet foods, the better to ring in a sweet year, we cook the brisket with dried apricots and cranberries, apricot preserves, and cranberry sauce.

Braised Brisket in Apricot and Cranberry Sauce Recipe »

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Sous Vide Smoked Brisket

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

If you’re comfortable throwing tradition to the wind, consider replacing the braised brisket with a Southern-style one. This recipe lets you re-create a smoked brisket even if it’s getting too cold to fire up the smoker—we cook the meat sous vide with pink salt and liquid smoke to simulate the smoking process. You can then finish in a smoker or just use the oven.

Sous Vide Smoked Brisket Recipe »

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Sous Vide Chicken Breast

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

If you’re looking for a more humble main course, chicken is a good way to go. Chicken breast has a bad reputation, but when cooked sous vide, it can become shockingly tender and flavorful. We’re fans of the very soft texture you get from cooking chicken at 140 to 145°F (60 to 63°C). That might sound like a dangerously low temperature, but cooking meat slowly at a lower temperature can pasteurize it as effectively as cooking it quickly at a higher one.

Sous Vide Chicken Breast Recipe »

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Lemon-Marinated Tuscan-Jewish Fried Chicken

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

I had never thought of fried chicken as a traditional Jewish food, but turns out, it’s a significant part of the Tuscan-Jewish culinary canon. The chicken is typically marinated with lemon juice and spices before it’s fried in olive oil, though you can use vegetable oil if you want the citrus flavor to be more pronounced.

Lemon-Marinated Tuscan-Jewish Fried Chicken Recipe »

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Curried Chicken With Israeli Couscous

[Photograph: Yasmin Fahr]

Don’t have hours to spend on your Rosh Hashanah spread? This one-pot dinner is worthy of a holiday table, but takes only half an hour to put together. We start by poaching chicken breast with curry powder, then cook couscous in the same pot and wilt in chopped Swiss chard.

Curried Chicken With Israeli Couscous Recipe »

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Whole Roasted Fish With Oregano, Parsley, and Lemon

[Photograph: Daniel Gritzer]

Fish heads are a traditional part of the Rosh Hashanah meal, so if you’ve never tried cooking a whole fish before, this is a good time to start. It’s easier than you might think, and the results are superb, since the skin protects the meat and makes it extra tender. The best way to flavor a whole fish is to stuff the body cavity with aromatics—here, we go with fresh herbs, garlic, ginger, and lemon.

Whole Roasted Fish With Oregano, Parsley, and Lemon Recipe »

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Whole Roasted Branzino With Tangerine-Fennel Vinaigrette

[Photograph: Daniel Gritzer]

We stuff this fish with rosemary, fennel fronds, and tangerine slices before cooking, but also add a citrusy tangerine-fennel vinaigrette for extra flavor. One of the most intimidating parts of cooking whole fish is knowing how to serve it, but check out our carving guide, and you’ll be a pro in no time.

Whole Roasted Branzino With Tangerine-Fennel Vinaigrette Recipe »

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Eggplant and Tomato Sauce With Israeli Couscous

[Photograph: Yasmin Fahr]

Vegetarians shouldn’t feel left out of the Rosh Hashanah dinner—this easy recipe will satisfy your guests whether or not they eat meat. Tomatoes and eggplant make a sauce for the Israeli couscous, and a pinch of turmeric gives the dish a bit of Moroccan flavor. If you don’t have access to really good, in-season fresh tomatoes, a 28-ounce can of whole peeled tomatoes will work as a replacement.

Eggplant and Tomato Sauce With Israeli Couscous Recipe »

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Pan-Roasted Rack of Lamb

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Sometimes, the best way to let all the side dishes you’ve made shine is to keep your main dish nice and simple. This pan-roasted rack of lamb is juicy and rich, and since it’s sparingly flavored with garlic and thyme, it will go perfectly with nearly any vegetable or side dish you make.

Pan-Roasted Rack of Lamb Recipe »

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Sous Vide Rack of Lamb

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

While pan-roasting is fun, and can result in a beautifully brown rack of lamb, it can also produce overcooked meat if you aren’t used to the cooking method. Cooking lamb sous vide will ensure the meat is a lovely medium-rare from edge to edge. Here, we finish the lamb by searing the rack in a smoking-hot pan with butter, aromatics, shallots, and sliced garlic.

Sous Vide Rack of Lamb Recipe »

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Rosh Hashanah Side Dishes

The Best Matzo Ball Soup

[Photograph: Daniel Gritzer]

People have fierce loyalties when it comes to matzo ball recipes, and ours offers different options to cater to every preference. By adjusting the amount of seltzer, baking powder, and/or beaten egg white, you can end up with dense sinkers, pillowy floaters, or anything in between.

The Best Matzo Ball Soup Recipe »

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Masa Ball Soup

[Photograph: Daniel Gritzer]

Yes, this recipe was born from a pun, but no, that doesn’t mean it’s anything less than delicious. To give matzo ball soup a Mexican twist, we make the dumplings with masa harina para tamales and schmaltz or vegetable oil, then float them in chicken broth spiked with jalapeño, lime juice, and cilantro.

Masa Ball Soup Recipe »

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Stovetop Tzimmes With Carrots and Raisins

[Photograph: Niki Achitoff-Gray]

The classic accompaniment to braised brisket, tzimmes too often suffer from mushy texture and oversweetening. This version, made with carrots, onions, and golden raisins, is more balanced. It gets much of its sweetness, plus a citrusy flavor, from fresh orange juice, with just a touch of honey added; spices like cardamom and cinnamon bring the dish more depth.

Stovetop Tzimmes With Carrots and Raisins Recipe »

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The Best Challah

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

It’s just not Rosh Hashanah without a loaf of challah. Of course, good challah might be widely available in stores near you, but this recipe is easy enough for beginner-to-intermediate bakers, and richer than anything you’ll find at the local bakery. The hardest part is braiding the dough, but the bread will taste so good that no one is going to mind if it looks a little funny.

The Best Challah Recipe »

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Roasted Carrots With Harissa and Crème Fraîche

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Carrots are a symbolic ingredient for Rosh Hashanah, and we love them in this recipe, where they’re roasted with harissa, cumin, and black pepper and served with crème fraîche. You can buy the crème fraîche at the grocery store, but it’s also incredibly easy to make at home—just mix two tablespoons of cultured buttermilk with a pint of cream, and let the mixture sit at room temperature for 12 hours.

Roasted Carrots With Harissa and Crème Fraîche Recipe »

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Roasted Carrots With Black Sesame Dressing

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

In this recipe, we roast the carrots with nothing more than olive oil, but the dish still gets plenty of flavor from a sauce made with earthy, slightly bitter black sesame paste. To make sure the carrots are soft and caramelized but not too shriveled, we blanch them in salted water before roasting.

Roasted Carrots With Black Sesame Dressing Recipe »

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Beet and Wheat Berry Salad With Pickled Apples and Pecans

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

This make-ahead wheat berry salad combines two different symbolic Rosh Hashanah foods: beets and apples. We use every part of the beets, roasting the bulbs and sautéing the greens. The apples are quick-pickled in white wine vinegar to give the hearty salad a little acidity.

Beet and Wheat Berry Salad With Pickled Apples and Pecans Recipe »

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Braised Leeks With Lemon and Parsley

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Leeks are called karsi in Hebrew, similar to the word that means “to cut.” Eating leeks, then, is a symbol of cutting the bad people out of our lives. This is one of our favorite ways to cook them: cut in half, browned on one side, and braised in white wine and chicken broth until tender.

Braised Leeks With Lemon and Parsley Recipe »

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Chilled Minty Carrot Soup With Dukkah Yogurt

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik]

A chilled, refreshing bowl of soup is an ideal start to a rich, hearty meal of roast meat and vegetables. This bright orange bowl of soup features a blended combination of carrots, onions, garlic, and other aromatics. A bit of fresh mint mixed into the soup is fresh and cooling, cut by a creamy dollop of dukkah to garnish.

Chilled Minty Carrot Soup With Dukkah Yogurt Recipe »

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