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Get to Know Ginger Juice Flavor With Sichuan Expert Fuchsia Dunlop

Get to Know Ginger Juice Flavor With Sichuan Expert Fuchsia Dunlop

[Video: Serious Eats Team] Today we continue with Fuchsia Dunlop in our exploration of some of the 23 canonical flavors of the Sichuan kitchen beyond málà (hot and numbing), and there may be none further from the realm of prickly Sichuan peppercorns and fiery chilies […]

Fried Egg Sandwiches With ‘Nduja Mayo and Broccoli Rabe Recipe

Fried Egg Sandwiches With ‘Nduja Mayo and Broccoli Rabe Recipe

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik] A great breakfast sandwich can really set the tone for a solid weekend, but making them yourself can sometimes feel like a bit of an ordeal. Cooking bacon or sausage for an egg sandwich isn’t hard, but I don’t always want to […]

Spicy ‘Nduja Mayonnaise Recipe | Serious Eats

Spicy ‘Nduja Mayonnaise Recipe | Serious Eats


[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

If you like spiking mayonnaise with sriracha, gochujang, or harissa to add a little heat to sandwiches, burgers, French fries, grilled seafood, and other mayo-friendly foods, then you need to give this ‘nduja mayo a try.

For the uninitiated, ‘nduja is a spicy, spreadable fermented pork salume from the southern Italian region of Calabria. ‘Nduja’s high fat content lends it a soft, spreadable texture, and also allows it to easily emulsify and meld into sauces.

Here, we stir a couple of tablespoons of ‘nduja into mayonnaise along with a splash of lemon juice for the perfect sandwich condiment. The Calabrian chilies in the ‘nduja provide plenty of floral heat that you’d want in a spicy mayo, but the meaty richness of the pork makes this sandwich spread anything but ordinary.



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Fried Egg Sandwiches With ‘Nduja Mayo and Broccoli Rabe Recipe

Fried Egg Sandwiches With ‘Nduja Mayo and Broccoli Rabe Recipe

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik] A great breakfast sandwich can really set the tone for a solid weekend, but making them yourself can sometimes feel like a bit of an ordeal. Cooking bacon or sausage for an egg sandwich isn’t hard, but I don’t always want to […]

Friday Links & Hijinks | Serious Eats

Friday Links & Hijinks | Serious Eats

[Illustration: Biodiversity Heritage Library] You did it! Another week down! We’re putting up a post very much like this one every Friday afternoon to celebrate the fact that the week is done. We think of this series as something of a send-off for the week, […]

Pressure Cooker Ribollita (Tuscan Bean and Vegetable Stew) Recipe

Pressure Cooker Ribollita (Tuscan Bean and Vegetable Stew) Recipe


[Photographs: Vicky Wasik]

The history of ribollita is one of tradition—after making a big pot of vegetable soup, Italians would stretch any leftovers into a stew by reheating it the following day and adding beans and stale bread to the mix, thereby creating a new meal for a new day. That’s why it’s called ribollita, which means “re-boiled,” a name that describes the two-stage cooking process.

But while ribollita may have been born out of frugal necessity, there’s no reason we need to follow that same path today. Using a pressure cooker, we can make the soup all at once in a fraction of the original’s stovetop cooking time. It’s such a huge time-saver, and leads to such great results, that I’m not sure I’ll ever want to make ribollita without a pressure cooker again.

A pressure cooker is the perfect tool for cooking this dish for a few reasons. First, ribollita is at its best when all the vegetables are cooked to a texture that borders on melting. And because a pressure cooker is able to cook food at a higher temperature than what’s possible in a normal simmering pot, it can deliver those exceptionally tender vegetable morsels in much less time.

As effective as a pressure cooker is at tenderizing vegetables, it’s even more so with the beans in ribollita. Dried beans, which deliver far better flavor than their canned counterparts, normally take many hours to prepare. First, there’s the overnight soaking time (this can sometimes be skipped, though there’s a slightly higher risk of the beans cooking more unevenly if you do), followed by a long and gentle simmer that can take well over an hour in the case of the cannellini beans here.

With a pressure cooker, though, you can skip the soaking step, dump the dried beans straight into the cooker, and end up with creamy, tender beans just one hour later. Because ribollita is all about making the ingredients meld together into a stew, it’s totally fine if some of the beans overcook or blow out—the ribollita will be that much more delicious.

The two thing we keep out of the pressure cooker until later in the process are the kale, which turns to muddy mush if allowed to cook under high pressure for a full hour as well as the bread, which only needs a few minutes to absorb the broth and soften (note too that while ribollita traditionally used up stale bread remnants, you can use fresh bread instead and get equally delicious results).

Keep in mind that while this recipe is formulated to fill an eight-quart pressure cooker, you are free to make any substitutions you want, adding or replacing any vegetables or even the bean type based on your personal preferences or what ingredients you have at home. The only things you’ll need to pay mind to are that you don’t accidentally overfill your cooker when making substitutions and that different beans cook at different rates, so you may need to adjust your cooking time accordingly.



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Pressure Cooker Ribollita (Tuscan Bean and Vegetable Stew) Recipe

Pressure Cooker Ribollita (Tuscan Bean and Vegetable Stew) Recipe

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik] The history of ribollita is one of tradition—after making a big pot of vegetable soup, Italians would stretch any leftovers into a stew by reheating it the following day and adding beans and stale bread to the mix, thereby creating a new […]

What Is Fast Food? | Serious Eats

What Is Fast Food? | Serious Eats

[Photograph: Shutterstock] Editor’s note: This is the first entry in a new column from journalist and author Adam Chandler, who will be covering fast food in an attempt to make sense of the complexities of the industry as it evolves, adapts, and continues to inspire […]

Korean Marinated Spinach Banchan (Sigeumchi Namul) Recipe

Korean Marinated Spinach Banchan (Sigeumchi Namul) Recipe


[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Sigeumchi namul is a classic Korean banchan of blanched spinach marinated in a garlic- and sesame-scented dressing. Served at cool room temperature, this side dish is light and refreshing, perfect alongside spicy Korean barbecue, hot and cheesy fire chicken, warming knife-cut noodle soup, a hearty bossam spread, or as part of any simple weeknight dinner.

This recipe not only comes together in minutes, but it also can be made in advance and refrigerated for up to 3 days. So whether you need some more greenery in your bringing-lunch-from-home routine or an easy, tasty side dish for your next dinner party, sigeumchi namul has got you covered.



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Korean Marinated Spinach Banchan (Sigeumchi Namul) Recipe

Korean Marinated Spinach Banchan (Sigeumchi Namul) Recipe

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik] Sigeumchi namul is a classic Korean banchan of blanched spinach marinated in a garlic- and sesame-scented dressing. Served at cool room temperature, this side dish is light and refreshing, perfect alongside spicy Korean barbecue, hot and cheesy fire chicken, warming knife-cut noodle […]