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Super-Thick Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

Super-Thick Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

2. Mix on low to moisten, then increase speed to medium and beat until soft, fluffy, and pale, about 8 minutes; halfway through, pause to scrape bowl and beater with a flexible spatula. With mixer running, add eggs one at a time, letting each incorporate […]

22 Asparagus Recipes to Put a Little Spring in Your Step

22 Asparagus Recipes to Put a Little Spring in Your Step

[Photographs: J. Kenji López-Alt, Vicky Wasik, Canal House. Video: Vicky Wasik] One of the miracles of the modern world is that you’re able to find fresh asparagus in your local supermarket in the middle of winter, and it might even taste okay. But those supermarket […]

10 Supermarket Chocolate Chips for Better Cookies and Pancakes

10 Supermarket Chocolate Chips for Better Cookies and Pancakes


[Photographs: Vicky Wasik. Video: Serious Eats Team]

If you’re a regular here at Serious Eats, chances are you’ve read Kenji’s thesis on the best chocolate chip cookies or my ode to old-fashioned chocolate chip cookies.

Both of us make the case for using chopped chocolate in our chocolate chip cookies. In part, this is because it allows us to buy an assortment of three-ounce chocolate bars to deliver a range of flavors, from bitter and sour to fruity and sweet, depending on the style and brand.

But this mix-and-match approach will create textural diversity in our cookie dough as well, thanks to all the irregular chunks, shards, fine shavings, and powder that are produced through chopping chocolate by hand. This gives cookies a hearty texture and a more distinctive, homemade appearance.

Along with those key benefits, the types of chocolate bars and blocks found at the supermarket have historically been of a substantially higher quality than the commercial morsels sold in a bag. (For more information, see our guides to the best supermarket milk chocolate bars, dark chocolate bars, and extra-dark chocolate bars).

an assortment of chocolate chips

But that’s been changing.

Even at the grocery store down the street from my home in Kentucky, I can find chocolate chips ranging from 55 to 70% cocoa solids, with some brands offering funky, single-origin chocolates and others bringing high-quality blends and couvertures to the market in chip form.

What’s more, commercial chocolate chips can be anywhere from nine to 15 millimeters in size, allowing for some of that textural diversity I love in chopped chocolate. This means I can now mix and match chocolate brands and styles to create my own blend, loaded with different textures, cocoa percentages, and flavor profiles.

homemade chocolate chip blend

Grabbing a few bags is a fun way to get to know the different brands, and the result is a one-of-a-kind mix of chocolate. And for those of us who bake regularly, none of it will go to waste. This custom blend can be stored in a big container to dip into as needed, or divvied up into 12-ounce portions (the size of a classic bag o’ chips, although this convention seems to be crumbling).

exploring chocolate chips

Think of this less as a definitive guide to chocolate chips than a personalized walkthrough of the different brands available in major supermarkets and via online retailers. You may enjoy certain brands enough to use them all on their own, while others can add a welcome bit of character to a blend even if they’re not your favorite for snacking.

Equal Exchange

At 55%, these semisweet chocolate chips from Equal Exchange land on the sweeter end of our tasting spectrum.

But it’s a balanced sweetness that comes from organic cane sugar, a style of sugar generally associated with complexity of flavor, as it retains more of its natural molasses content than a fully refined white sugar. The chocolate flavor is classic and mellow, with a touch of acidity and a strong cocoa aroma.

These cute, well-formed chips are about nine millimeters in diameter on average, and melt on the tongue with an especially creamy consistency. Equal Exchange sources the cocoa for these chips from Peru. The chips are soy-free, as well as certified vegan and kosher; they come in a 10-ounce bag.

Guittard 55%

While Guittard’s Akoma chips clock in at just 55% cocoa solids, they don’t seem sweet at all. Their flavor is nutty, deep, and pleasantly bitter.

At 11 millimeters across, these chips seem just right in size, neither miniature nor chunky. While they’re not as creamy as some chips, their slightly dry mouthfeel pairs nicely with richer doughs. Guittard sources the cocoa for these chips from West Africa. They’re soy-free and come in a 12-ounce bag.

Ghirardelli

This brand was among the first to step up the game for supermarket chocolate chips, by upgrading to a larger chip size (15 millimeters!) and listing the cocoa-butter percentage right on the bag. For those reasons, Ghirardelli 60% is the OG among home bakers.

These chips have a decidedly earthy vibe (I get a funky, shiitake note from the aroma) that’s slightly savory and acidic, and a relatively dry mouthfeel. The formula contains milk fat, an unusual move for a so-called dark chocolate, and an unpleasant surprise for many bakers. They come in a 12-ounce bag.

Callebaut

They’re not available in every grocery store, but I can often find Callebaut 60.3% chips in the bulk-foods aisle of my local co-op, or packaged in deli containers in the chocolate aisle at fancier supermarkets, like Whole Foods or Fresh Market. (Or online.)

This couverture-style chocolate chip is worth seeking out, as it’s loaded with cocoa butter, making it one of the creamiest chips around. It has a classic cocoa flavor and aroma that are mellow and smooth, with no sharpness or acidity at all (in fact, it’s a slightly alkalized style). At 10 millimeters across, these chips feel a little dainty, but still traditional overall.

Guittard 63%

This 63% chocolate chip from Guittard is creamier than its 55% sibling, thanks to a boost in cocoa butter, but with the same 11-millimeter size.

It’s none too sweet, with an acidic character that feels a little fruity or citrusy, and some hint of spice in the aroma. These chips are made with a blend of chocolate sourced from West Africa and South America. They’re soy-free and come in an 11.5-ounce bag.

Sunspire

While this probably isn’t my favorite chocolate to use on its own, I enjoy the funky, grassy, and slightly astringent quality of Sunspire 65% chips in a blend.

They have a rich and creamy mouthfeel, a mellow chocolate flavor with a nice acidity, and a cute, 10-millimeter size. Soy-free; nine-ounce bag.

365 Everyday Value 67%

I was unexpectedly pleased with the chocolate chunks from Whole Foods’ house brand. At 67%, they offer a higher cocoa percentage than most brands, but they’re not excessively bitter at all.

Despite the absence of a classic chip shape, these 13-millimeter chunks have a very traditional chocolate flavor that’s not sharp or acidic, with a clean mouthfeel and sweet finish. They may not be as adorable as a kiss-shaped morsel, but I like the sturdy presence of chocolate chunks in a dough, and find these to be a welcome part of any blend. Kosher-certified; 12-ounce bag.

Enjoy Life

With only two ingredients—chocolate and sugar—Enjoy Life 69% will tick off a lot of boxes for folks with dietary restrictions, who often have trouble finding chocolate chips because of emulsifiers such as soy, or due to cross-contamination from gluten-containing products.

Despite the high cocoa percentage, these chips weren’t as smooth as I expected, and their sweetness surprised me. Still, their fruity-sour character has been a good addition to many of my recent chocolate chip blends, where these big, 12-millimeter chips make a nice visual impact. These chips are soy- and dairy-free, and they’re also certified kosher and halal; they come in a nine-ounce bag.

Chatfield’s

With a smooth and classic cocoa flavor, Chatfield’s 70% chocolate chips are a solid option for baking.

These chips have a creamy mouthfeel and balanced acidity, along with a cute, 10-millimeter size. They have a middle-of-the-road character that can stand on its own or act as a filler in a blend. These chips are soy- and dairy-free, as well as vegan and kosher-certified; they come in a 10-ounce bag.

Equal Exchange 70%

Like their 55% cousin, Equal Exchange 70% chocolate chips are a petite nine millimeters in size, with a cute, well-formed shape. These chips have a slow, melting richness that borders on waxy when eaten out of hand, but translates to a nice creaminess in baked goods.

While their flavor is pure chocolate, it has a roasted quality, like coffee, and a surprising bitterness. Some bakers will love this chocolate all on its own, while others will appreciate the balance it can bring to sweeter blends. These chips are soy- and dairy-free, as well as vegan- and kosher-certified; they come in a 10-ounce bag.

When shopping for chocolate chips, remember that diversity is key. A chocolate may not be entirely to your liking on its own, but it may work well as part of a blend, or else balance out some element of a sweet or bitter dough. The idea is to get to know the brands available and explore new options you may have never considered.

This post may contain links to Amazon or other partners; your purchases via these links can benefit Serious Eats. Read more about our affiliate linking policy.



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Matzo Pancakes (Chremslach) Recipe | Serious Eats

Matzo Pancakes (Chremslach) Recipe | Serious Eats

4. In a large nonstick or cast iron skillet, melt 1 tablespoon (15g) butter over medium heat until foaming. Using a soup spoon, dollop matzo batter into pan, forming small oval pancakes. Cook until golden on the first side, about 2 minutes. Turn pancakes and […]

Matzo Pancakes: One Part Pancake, One Part Matzo Brei, All Parts Delicious

Matzo Pancakes: One Part Pancake, One Part Matzo Brei, All Parts Delicious

[Photographs: Joel Russo] More Breakfast Everything you need to make the most important meal of the day delicious. My grandmother grew up in a household rich with Ashkenazi Jewish cooking, which I would never have known were it not for a surviving document her twin […]

24 Bright and Spring-y Easter Dessert Recipes

24 Bright and Spring-y Easter Dessert Recipes


20170331-easter-dessert-recipes-roundup-collage.jpg

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik, Nila Jones]

Easter offers no shortage of opportunities for eating sweets, between all the Cadbury eggs and chocolate bunnies, jelly beans and marshmallow Peeps. There’s nothing wrong with store-bought candy—what kid doesn’t love an Easter basket?—but a fancy holiday meal may call for a sweet ending that’s a little more homemade. Since the first signs of spring put us in mind of bright, clean flavors and delicate textures, many of the 24 dessert recipes below are on the lighter side, including an airy fruit mousse and a tall and fluffy angel food cake. But there’s room for richer fare, too, including traditional hot cross buns, a stunning brown butter–infused carrot cake, and an updated take on the classic mint-chocolate flavors of a grasshopper pie.

BraveTart’s Brown Butter Carrot Cake

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Bright and crunchy carrots can’t help but remind us of Easter—bunnies!—and their natural sweetness is on full display in this elegant layer cake. Nutty brown butter highlights the earthiness of carrots and pecans and the graham cracker–like notes of whole wheat flour. Spread the fluffy layers with a tangy cream cheese buttercream frosting, and, for an extra-special touch, top the whole creation off with decorative (but edible!) roses made from twisted carrot curls poached in sugar syrup. It’s a time-consuming recipe, but there’s a lot you can do in advance, including browning the butter, shredding the carrots, making the frosting, and toasting the nuts.

BraveTart’s Brown Butter Carrot Cake Recipe »

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Effortless Angel Food Cake

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

This cloud-like angel food cake is shockingly easy to prepare, with a meringue that’s as simple as whipping up egg whites, sugar, and vanilla, plus a bit of lemon juice and salt, in a stand mixer. After that, just stir in cake flour and scrape it all into an aluminum tube pan. We like to serve the cake with a light lemon chantilly and sweet berries tossed in fresh lemon syrup. If you’re baking for the gluten-intolerant, this gluten-free angel food cake might be even fluffier and more tender than the original recipe. Or, for a slight caramelly edge and subtler sweetness, try Stella’s toasted sugar angel food cake instead.

Effortless Angel Food Cake Recipe »

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Chocolate Meringue Cake With Whipped Cream and Raspberries

[Photograph: Nila Jones]

This elegant dessert’s gorgeous layers of rich chocolate cake, airy meringue, and fluffy whipped cream make for a showstopping centerpiece. A sweet-tart sauce made with fresh raspberries sits between the layers, complementing the richness of chocolate and brown sugar with bright and tangy fruit. If you have your hands full with the rest of your Easter menu, the cake, meringue, and filling can all be made ahead of time, then assembled right before serving.

Chocolate Meringue Cake With Whipped Cream and Raspberries Recipe »

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Chocolate Cherry Layer Cake

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Inspired by the classic combination of cherries and chocolate, this rich cake features high-quality cocoa powder and just enough tart cherry juice to bring out the chocolate’s fruity side. The whole thing is slathered in a lovely pastel-pink frosting, made with whipped cream and freeze-dried cherries.

Chocolate Cherry Layer Cake Recipe »

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Sour Cream Pound Cake

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Pound cake is a staple at many potluck family gatherings, and this one is as dense and buttery-soft as they get. Sour cream replaces a portion of the usual fat and eggs, providing lactose that results in a beautifully browned crust, while a combination of vanilla beans and extract produces a more nuanced vanilla flavor. We love this cake served with a healthy dollop of fruity whipped cream.

Sour Cream Pound Cake Recipe »

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Spiced Vanilla Hot Cross Buns

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Hot cross buns are traditionally eaten for breakfast on Good Friday, but they’re delicious enough to serve again a couple of days later. We use Greek yogurt to keep the dough soft and pliable, yet easy to handle. Candied orange peel, dried cherries and apricots, and an array of spices—coriander, cinnamon, allspice, and nutmeg—lend the buns plenty of fruity chew and heady fragrance.

Spiced Vanilla Hot Cross Buns Recipe »

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Dark Chocolate Easter Cookies

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

If you have more candy than you know what to do with come Easter, don’t foist it all on your coworkers Monday morning—set a few handfuls aside for making these cookies. Thanks to Dutch-process cocoa, the chocolate dough mixes up dark as night and slightly bitter, making it perfect for balancing out the sweetness of the candy bits. Use whatever chocolate-friendly candy you have on hand—this recipe is especially handy for using up those big, hollow chocolate bunnies that never seem to get eaten otherwise.

Dark Chocolate Easter Cookies Recipe »

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Crispy Lemon-Ginger Sandwich Cookies

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

The brightness of lemon is an especially welcome flavor profile this time of year, when most of us are still struggling through the final days of the colder months. These cookies were designed to mimic Carr’s Ginger Lemon Cremes: crisp, spicy gingerbread cookies with a citrusy filling, ideal for dunking into tea or serving with vanilla ice cream. Using refined coconut oil instead of butter in the filling allows the brightness of the lemon to shine through. The molasses in the dough, aside from contributing to its darker, richer flavor, helps the cookies spread out thin enough to sandwich.

Crispy Lemon-Ginger Sandwich Cookies Recipe »

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Lemon Meltaways

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Like a hybrid of lemon shortbread and cotton candy, these sugar-dusted meltaways are almost impossibly delicate. Here, some of the flour that you’d find in a typical cookie dough gets replaced with powdered sugar and tapioca starch—with less flour, these cookies really do melt when they hit your tongue. Unlike cornstarch, tapioca starch won’t make the cookies feel chalky and dry when they come out of the oven.

Lemon Meltaways Recipe »

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Sunny Lemon Bars

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

These velvety, rich lemon bars get a double dose of citrus: Lemon zest flavors the tender crust, while juice brightens the curd. Making the tart curd with equal parts whole eggs and egg yolks (as opposed to whole eggs alone) thickens it up without the addition of cornstarch. An anodized aluminum baking pan lined with parchment ensures that the bars don’t overcook in the oven or take on any off flavors from the metal (but do make sure your other cookware, including pots and strainers, is made of nonreactive metal, too!).

Sunny Lemon Bars Recipe »

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Fresh and Creamy Lime Pie

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

This pie resembles a cross between lemon meringue pie and Key lime—and yes, it’s as good as that sounds. The nuttier flavor of a whole wheat pie crust does a particularly good job of setting off a deliciously sweet-and-sour custard that’s thickened with whole eggs to keep the citrus flavor prominent. Top the pie with fluffy Swiss meringue—you can get fancy with a pastry bag and star tip like Stella’s done here, or just swirl it on freeform—which will brown and puff nicely in the oven.

Fresh and Creamy Lime Pie Recipe »

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Grasshopper Ice Cream Pie

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Refreshing mint is another flavor profile that gets us in a spring kind of mood. Our version of a retro grasshopper pie incorporates Fernet Branca instead of crème de menthe, for a bitter, herbaceous edge to accompany the peppermint extract, and thickens the filling with whole eggs instead of marshmallow for a pie that’s richer and less sweet. A cocoa-nib fudge and drizzles of chocolate throughout the filling ensure you’ll get a little chocolate in every bite.

Grasshopper Ice Cream Pie Recipe »

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No-Bake Chocolate-Nutella “Cheesecake” Verrines

[Photograph: Nila Jones]

These parfait-style individual desserts look highly sophisticated, but they’re a snap to make. Just layer an Oreo crumb crust, dark chocolate and Nutella-cheesecake fillings, and homemade whipped cream in a little glass, then sprinkle on more crushed Oreos and toasted hazelnuts—no baking necessary.

No-Bake Chocolate-Nutella “Cheesecake” Verrines Recipe »

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Tangy Strawberry Fools

[Photograph: Yvonne Ruperti]

A classic English fool layers custard with stewed fruit. For a lighter version perfect for spring, we swap a blend of whipped cream and yogurt for the rich custard, and both fresh and macerated strawberries for the traditional cooked fruit. You can also try the same dessert in versions with lemon and blueberry or pineapple, mango, and coconut.

Tangy Strawberry Fools Recipe »

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Light and Easy 5-Minute Fruit Mousse

[Photograph: Nila Jones]

Desserts don’t get much simpler than this refreshing fruit mousse—all you need are three ingredients, five minutes, and a food processor. Mixing an egg white with frozen fruit (any kind you’d like) and sugar turns what would otherwise be a plain fruit purée into a fluffy treat.

Light and Easy 5-Minute Fruit Mousse Recipe »

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Vanilla Bean Panna Cotta

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Creamy, delicate, and sophisticated, this panna cotta is delicious perfectly plain, but also makes an excellent accompaniment for fresh or lightly macerated fruit. We steep the cream with Tahitian vanilla for at least an hour and up to 24 hours to get the deepest flavor. In place of or in addition to the vanilla, you can also try steeping with lemon zest, cinnamon sticks, lavender, fresh ginger—this recipe makes a brilliant canvas for all kinds of interesting flavors.

Vanilla Bean Panna Cotta Recipe »

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Cranachan (Scottish Whipped Cream With Whisky, Raspberries, and Toasted Oats)

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

A traditional Scottish dessert that’s tasty, pretty, and easy, cranachan consists of raspberries layered with toasted oats, honey, and whipped cream spiked with Scotch. Soaking the oats in the cream you’ll whip later helps tenderize them, so they turn crisp, not tough, when toasted in the oven. An optional addition of mascarpone in the whipped cream makes the final product richer and more mousse-like.

Cranachan (Scottish Whipped Cream With Whisky, Raspberries, and Toasted Oats) Recipe »

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Meyer Lemon Ice Cream

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Thin-skinned Meyer lemons, found in supermarkets from roughly November through March, are sweeter, more floral, and less harsh than conventional lemons, making them a much better choice for infusing into ice cream. The result is rich and creamy, yet bright and tangy at the same time. This ice cream uses fewer eggs than usual, for a leaner, more refreshing profile, with cornstarch added to keep it silky-smooth. An optional splash of orange curaçao or other citrus liqueur plays up the orangey notes in the Meyers.

Meyer Lemon Ice Cream Recipe »

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Meringue Nests With Orange Curd Cream and Easter Eggs

[Photograph: Nila Jones]

In this delightful spring treat, each delicate meringue “nest” holds a swirl of tangy, bright orange curd and cradles a pair of store-bought candy-covered chocolate eggs. The nests and curd can both be made several days ahead of time—just don’t combine them until right before serving, or else the meringue will get soggy.

Meringue Nests With Orange Curd Cream and Easter Eggs Recipe »

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Chocolate Marshmallow Peeps

[Photograph: Yvonne Ruperti]

Marshmallow Peeps may not be your ideal Easter dessert, but what if you could make them at home, with full control over the flavoring and sugar level? These adorable homemade Peeps, infused with rich cocoa and dabbed with semisweet chocolate for eyes, have the festive look of the mass-produced originals, with a more subdued sweetness. Piping them out into chick-like shapes is easy—just allow the marshmallow to thicken a bit first.

Chocolate Marshmallow Peeps Recipe »

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Cherry Ice Cream

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik]

We’d be lying if we said this recipe was quick or easy. But it’s worth every bit of work. First, the cherries are roasted with their pits in, to concentrate the fruity flavor, then the pits are steeped in cream. The finished ice cream is a beautiful pinkish-red, with incredibly concentrated and pure cherry flavor.

Cherry Ice Cream Recipe »

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No-Bake Cookies With Chocolate, Peanut Butter, and Chewy Oats

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

These chewy oatmeal cookies aren’t really, well, cookies at all. They’re a type of creamy peanut butter fudge, and as long as you’re equipped with a digital thermometer, they’re as easy as can be.

No-Bake Cookies With Chocolate, Peanut Butter, and Chewy Oats Recipe »

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Creamy Whipped Greek Yogurt

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

This whipped Greek yogurt is a perfect dessert for the warmer months. It’s a light and airy mixture of whipped cream and tangy, dense yogurt. Serve it with fresh fruit, nuts, a drizzle of honey, or eat it plain.

Creamy Whipped Greek Yogurt Recipe »

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Double Strawberry Cake

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

This pale-pink layer cake practically screams “spring!” It takes on its beautiful color thanks to a combination of fresh strawberry purée and freeze-dried strawberries pulverized into a fine powder. You can finish this light and fluffy cake with Swiss buttercream, strawberry whipped cream, or—our favorite—tangy cream cheese frosting to highlight the tart strawberries.

Double Strawberry Cake Recipe »

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This post may contain links to Amazon or other partners; your purchases via these links can benefit Serious Eats. Read more about our affiliate linking policy.



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How to Make XO Sauce, the Cook’s Condiment

How to Make XO Sauce, the Cook’s Condiment

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik] A few days ago I had a text message exchange with a chef friend of mine about our Mount Rushmores of condiments and sauces. Condiments are something that we care deeply about. They are ready-to-use flavor-boosters, as vital to restaurant kitchens as […]

XO Sauce

XO Sauce

XO sauce is a flavor bomb condiment that you should have at your disposal at all times. Get Recipe! Source link

13 Passover Dessert Recipes for a Sweet Finish

13 Passover Dessert Recipes for a Sweet Finish


Collage of photographs of Passover-appropriate desserts: double-caramel flan; whipped Greek yogurt with fruit; saffron, orange, and honey ice cream; and honey-vanilla almond cake

[Collage photographs: Vicky Wasik, Max Falkowitz, Jennifer Latham]

For some bakers, whipping up a homemade dessert that’s both delicious and Passover-appropriate is the kind of task that sounds too daunting even to attempt. While there’s certainly nothing wrong with going store-bought if the thought stresses you out, that’s not your only option!

Consider a type of sweet that inherently lends itself to working within your dietary restrictions—sorbets and meringues, for example, or a creamy, smooth-as-silk caramel flan if you’re planning a dairy dessert. For fresh twists on the classics, we’ve got coconut macaroons enriched with dulce de leche and dipped in chocolate, or an incredibly moist, aromatic flourless cake scented with orange and saffron. Below are 13 of our favorite Passover treats that won’t just do the job, but will impress the heck out of anyone who tastes them.

A note about the recipes that follow: Though some were designed with Passover in mind, others are meant to be more all-purpose, which means some of them contain ingredients not considered kosher for Passover—or, at least, not considered by everyone to be such. Ordinary vanilla extract and vanilla paste are not considered kosher for Passover; you may substitute a kosher vanilla extract or (preferably in recipes where their flavor won’t be drowned out by other powerful ingredients) the scraped beans from a vanilla pod. As dietary restrictions and traditions vary widely, we’ve chosen here to offer a range of recipes to meet a range of preferences, with the hope that everyone will be able to find a dish that they love.

Dairy Desserts

Eggless Chocolate Mousse

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

A homemade sweetened condensed milk combined with Dutch cocoa produces a luxuriously smooth and dark chocolate mousse with no eggs or gelatin at all. The alkalinity of the cocoa powder prevents the dairy from curdling, and the condensed milk is thick enough to serve as a stable base all on its own. We lighten up the superrich chocolate base by folding in freshly whipped cream.

Eggless Chocolate Mousse Recipe »

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Double-Caramel Flan

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

This gorgeous custard is chock-full of caramel, from the creamy center to the deep, dark layer on top, while a higher-than-usual ratio of egg yolks and cream makes it insanely rich. If you like, add nutty toffee notes by toasting the cream first, either in a pressure cooker or by cooking it sous vide. Tempering the eggs before combining them with the caramel, cream, and milk ensures that they incorporate smoothly.

Double-Caramel Flan Recipe »

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The Best Chocolate-Dipped Coconut Macaroons

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

For our chocolate-dipped version of the classic Passover dessert, we toast unsweetened coconut flakes in the microwave to deepen their color and flavor. To lend subtler vanilla and almond flavors, this recipe calls for vanilla paste and nut liqueur instead of the typical extracts; substitute kosher vanilla extract or vanilla beans if necessary to keep the macaroons kosher. Dulce de leche is our choice for making these extra chewy and creamy, though you can substitute sweetened condensed milk (try this recipe for making it at home!) to keep the cookies coconut-white.

The Best Chocolate-Dipped Coconut Macaroons Recipe »

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Easy, Light, and Tender Honey-Vanilla Almond Cake

[Photograph: Jennifer Latham]

Ground whole almonds or store-bought almond meal serves as a flavorful stand-in for wheat flour in this pretty cake, made surprisingly airy with egg whites whipped to soft peaks. A little acid in the form of lemon juice helps to stabilize the whites before they’re mixed into the batter, and honey gives it a comforting sticky sweetness. This recipe calls for butter to grease the pan, but you could easily swap it out for oil to make this a parve dessert.

Easy, Light, and Tender Honey-Vanilla Almond Cake Recipe »

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Flourless Orange-Saffron Cake

[Photograph: Yvonne Ruperti]

Like the honey cake just above, this Middle Eastern–inspired flourless cake is made with ground almonds, but its unbelievable moistness comes from an unexpected addition: puréed whole oranges. Softening them in the microwave makes it easier to blend them, rinds and all, into a paste, which we then whisk into the other ingredients. Vibrant red saffron threads and a honey glaze give the dessert wonderful color and fragrance.

Flourless Orange-Saffron Cake Recipe »

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Saffron, Honey, and Orange Ice Cream

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

This unusual but totally delicious ice cream is like the frosty cousin of the cake above—a smooth, creamy custard tinted pale orange from saffron, lightly sweetened with floral honey, with citrusy and slightly bitter notes from orange zest. We recommend a mildly flavored honey, such as acacia, alfalfa, or orange blossom, that won’t overwhelm the other ingredients.

Saffron, Honey, and Orange Ice Cream Recipe »

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Meyer Lemon Ice Cream

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

This fresh, bright Meyer lemon ice cream is another great choice for your Passover table. Packed with fresh Meyer lemon juice and Meyer lemon zest, along with a dash of citrus liqueur, it’s loaded with spring flavor. Note that this recipe contains a small amount of cornstarch, which some will want to avoid during Passover.

Meyer Lemon Ice Cream Recipe »

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Creamy Whipped Greek Yogurt

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Looking for a tasty dairy dessert that’s about as easy as it gets? Whipping Greek yogurt using a stand mixer may sound a little too simple, but the texture it takes on—like a hybrid of thick yogurt and fluffy whipped cream—is to die for, especially when layered with fresh or roasted fruit. Heavy cream thickens the yogurt, while a touch of honey lends gentle sweetness and rosewater or vanilla bean adds flavor.

Creamy Whipped Greek Yogurt Recipe »

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Nondairy Desserts

Apple-Ginger Tishpishti (Gluten-Free Almond and Walnut Cake)

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

You might make this flavorful apple-ginger cake once with Passover in mind, but we have a pretty good feeling you’ll be bringing it back all year long. The batter uses almond flour in place of wheat flour, keeping it gluten-free; incorporating grated apple ensures it remains moist and tender.

Apple-Ginger Tishpishti (Gluten-Free Almond and Walnut Cake) Recipe »

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Chocolate Chip Meringue Cookies

[Photograph: Lauren Weisenthal]

Chocoholics will love these light little meringue cookies, which put the bittersweet flavor of high-quality dark chocolate front and center. Making the meringue itself constitutes the lion’s share of the work here, and even that isn’t as tough as you might think if you’re new to the process—our tests have shown that even if a dab of yolk makes its way into the bowl, your egg whites will still whip up just fine.

Chocolate Chip Meringue Cookies Recipe »

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Apple Compote

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

An old-fashioned apple compote makes an elegant dish on its own, or a perfect accompaniment to other desserts, whether it’s Passover or not. Poaching the peeled and sliced apples in both cider and cider vinegar fortifies their flavor, and the right blend of aromatics—nutmeg, cinnamon, lemon zest, and ginger—helps enhance their aroma. The slow, gentle poaching ensures the fruit turns out tender, not mushy.

Apple Compote Recipe »

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Mango Sorbet

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

Sweet, buttery Ataúlfo mangoes are in season this time of year, so Passover is the ideal occasion to make a batch of this simple yet devastatingly good sorbet—all it takes is mangoes, lime juice, sugar, and a little salt. Thanks to the high ratio of fruit to water, the sorbet churns up extremely rich and creamy, with a beautiful deep-golden color.

Mango Sorbet Recipe »

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Pear, Riesling, and Ginger Sorbet

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

The sophisticated flavor profile of this sorbet is built on the unexpected combination of mild, fruity pear; sweet-and-tart Riesling; and spicy ginger—a little less unexpected, perhaps, when you remember that pears poached in wine is a classic Continental dessert. Look for a moderately sweet Riesling with an alcohol content of around 12%. The amount of ginger called for here is enough to give the sorbet a nice kick, although you can cut it down a little if you prefer.

Pear, Riesling, and Ginger Sorbet Recipe »

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15 Passover Dinner Recipes for a Super Seder

15 Passover Dinner Recipes for a Super Seder

[Collage photographs: Daniel Gritzer, Vicky Wasik, J. Kenji López-Alt] Technically, the most important part of Passover is, of course, the seder itself. But no one comes to a seder without expecting to be fed a proper meal, especially after they’ve drunk all that wine. Passover […]