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Coconut Oil Is Key to These 18 Dessert Recipes

Coconut Oil Is Key to These 18 Dessert Recipes

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik] At a recent stop on my book tour, someone asked if I had any “pet” ingredients that the average baker may not have on hand. In the heat of the moment, all I could think of was malted milk powder, what I […]

23 Baking Recipes, No Stand Mixer Required

23 Baking Recipes, No Stand Mixer Required

[Photographs: Nila Jones, Vicky Wasik] Getting a stand mixer is a milestone in a baker’s life—it’s big, expensive, and opens up a whole world of cakes, breads, and more. The classic KitchenAid stand mixer is virtually synonymous with baking, but that doesn’t mean you’re out […]

This Fluffy No-Churn Ice Cream Pie Is the Perfect Summer Treat

This Fluffy No-Churn Ice Cream Pie Is the Perfect Summer Treat


slice being removed from ice cream pie

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik]

During my recipe testing for homemade Klondike bars last summer, I made countless iterations of a no-churn ice cream based on Swiss meringue. Its fluffy, cloud-like consistency and clean, neutral flavor provided the perfect foundation for the pure vanilla filling found in a Klondike bar.

My earliest efforts were mere combinations of Swiss meringue and whipped cream, which gave the “ice cream” a wonderful richness and fresh dairy flavor, along the lines of DQ soft serve, but firm enough to slice. Problem was, however delicious, these versions were too creamy for a Klondike bar, which has a firm and pleasantly icy bite, and it was a touch too soft to hold the sharp corners that make each square so satisfying.

Eventually, I discovered that adding a splash of milk could provide the ice cream with the texture I needed, but I never stopped thinking about the “failure” that came so close. While it had a wonderfully light and creamy texture, the Klondike aspirations at its heart made it too firm for scooping. Bad news for a proper ice cream, but brilliant for an ice cream pie!

no-churn ice cream pie with a slice set out

Like the fluffy quarts of supermarket ice cream that can miraculously survive the journey home from the store, this ice cream is ultra airy, so it melts with preternatural slowness—another quality that’s ideal for slices of pie, particularly in warm weather.

If you’ve ever made Swiss meringue, whether to top a pie or for a buttercream, the overall process will be familiar; the only difference will be a bit of whipped cream folded in at the end. And if you’ve gone so far as to try my homemade Klondike bars, you’ll be in familiar territory, as well.

Prepare the No-Bake Crust

The first step is to prepare a cookie-crumb crust. Because I can’t resist the combination of chocolate and vanilla, I like to use homemade Oreos crushed into crumbs (wafers only). Store-bought Oreos will, of course, work equally well.

preparing the cookie crumb crust

With a little melted butter, they come together in a crust that will be nice and crunchy once frozen.

If Oreos aren’t your jam, let personal preference guide your choice. The crust will taste great with store-bought or homemade Biscoff, as well as commercial or made-from-scratch graham crackers (there’s a recipe in my cookbook, BraveTart: Iconic American Desserts), or even crispy gingerbread cookies in winter months. Whatever the style, gluten-free cookies will do just fine here, as well.

Prepare the No-Churn Filling

To make the “ice cream” filling, prepare a water bath by filling a wide pot with a few inches of water, with a thick ring of crumpled foil placed in the bottom.

foil booster for water bath

The ring acts as a booster seat, so that when I place my stand mixer bowl over the water, it will sit high, touching neither the water nor the pot itself. This allows steam to flow freely around the bowl, gently warming the eggs with indirect heat.

When the bowl touches the water, the bottom of the pot, or even the sides (thus forming a lid to the pot), the heat will be too strong and direct, leading to scrambled whites. If you’re using a stand mixer that comes with a footed bowl, skip this setup and use a glass or ceramic bowl instead of the stand mixer bowl (in which case, it’s fine for the bowl to touch the sides of the pot).

Bring the water to a boil, then adjust the heat to maintain a gentle simmer; the idea is to generate lots of steam, rather than to let the water boil hard. Meanwhile, combine the egg whites with plain or toasted sugar, salt and lemon juice or cream of tartar in the bowl of a stand mixer (along with the salt, those last two function as seasoning rather than structural elements, a touch of acidity to bring balance to the sweet fluff).

cooking the Swiss meringue

While stirring and scraping constantly, warm the egg whites and sugar over the steaming water until they reach approximately 172°F (77°C). In a stainless steel stand mixer bowl, this should take only about five minutes; a slower timeline simply indicates a lack of steam, so adjust the heat as needed to move things along.

When the meringue reaches the proper temperature, transfer the bowl to a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment and whip on medium-high speed until it’s fluffy, thick, stiff, and incredibly light.

The timing of this phase will vary depending on the power of the mixer itself, but it generally takes from five to eight minutes, giving the meringue ample time to cool.

folding whipped cream into Swiss meringue

Once the meringue is ready, it’s time to whip the cream and vanilla to stiff peaks as well. This can be done by hand (or with a hand mixer) in a separate bowl, or the meringue can be scraped into another container so the stand mixer bowl and whisk can be re-used for the task (no need to wash either, bits of meringue will not interfere with whipping the cream).

However you go about it, fold the whipped cream and meringue together with a flexible spatula or with a wide, open balloon whisk. It can be a touch tricky to assess the white-on-white mixture, but work patiently to ensure they’re homogenous so the ice cream is evenly textured. At this stage, try a bit of the “ice cream” and doctor it with additional salt and vanilla (or other extracts) as desired, bearing in mind its sweetness will be less noticeable once frozen.

Finally, and this is a completely optional step, fold in a handful of rainbow sprinkles.

rainbow sprinkles being added to the ice cream

It’s a celebratory touch that makes the pie feel fit for a party, but if that’s not your jam it’s strictly a matter of aesthetics, so feel free to leave them out (or swap in chocolate sprinkles instead).

If you have my cookbook, however, homemade sprinkles can also provide a pop of flavor in the pie, such as bright pink strawberry sprinkles or flecks of minty green.

preparing no-churn ice cream as a pie

Scrape the filling into the prepared shell, then cover it loosely but thoroughly with plastic and freeze until it reaches an internal temperature around 0°F. Due to the thickness of the pie, this can take quite some time—eight hours at the least.

That means it’s nearly impossible to make and serve this pie in one day, but, by the same token, it’s a fantastic make-ahead dessert, whether it’s prepared the night before or the week before an event.

slice of no-churn ice cream pie

Slice the pie with a large chef’s knife, warmed in hot water, then wipe the blade clean and rewarm between each slice. It’s a bit time consuming, to be sure, but it will ensure beautifully clean slices.

slice of no-churn ice cream pie

Because the no-churn ice cream is mounded into a mile-high presentation, thin slices can go a long way, making it the sort of pie that’s fit for a crowd. You’ll have no trouble cutting out 12 pieces, but with care it can easily serve up to 16 (especially at the end of a heavy meal, when appetites for dessert may be slightly repressed).

taking a bite from the pie

Thanks to its light texture and delicate flavor (no egg yolks for any heavy custard notes), it’s a refreshing end to any summer meal. So if you have a soft spot for the clean and refreshing flavor of the ice cream in a Klondike bar, or like the idea of a frozen dessert that combines the best elements of whipped cream and meringue, this frozen treat will be a perfectly festive dessert for any crowd.

This post may contain links to Amazon or other partners; your purchases via these links can benefit Serious Eats. Read more about our affiliate linking policy.



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No-Churn Vanilla Ice Cream Pie

No-Churn Vanilla Ice Cream Pie

It can be difficult to make enough homemade ice cream to serve a crowd, but it’s easy with a no-churn recipe that’s served like a pie. Get Recipe! Source link

Special Sauce: Priya Krishna on Cooking and Being “Indian-ish”

Special Sauce: Priya Krishna on Cooking and Being “Indian-ish”

[Priya Krishna photograph: Edlyn D’Souza. Saag photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt] In part two of my delightful conversation with Priya Krishna, she delves into her book Indian-ish: Recipes and Antics from a Modern American Family in so many unexpected and revealing ways. “Indian-ish” is not just […]

How to Make Creamy Chocolate Ice Cream Without an Ice Cream Machine

How to Make Creamy Chocolate Ice Cream Without an Ice Cream Machine


overhead shot of three scoops of chocolate ice cream in a dish

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik]

Last summer, I became a little obsessed with making no-churn vanilla ice cream. Typically, no-churn formulas combine evaporated or sweetened condensed milk with whipped cream for a relatively rich and dense frozen dessert with a distinctive flavor, owing to canned milk. This style can be tasty, but is often lacking in the custardy notes and light texture we associate with a classic, churned ice cream.

For a more traditional profile, if not technique, my recipe starts with whole eggs that have been briefly cooked over a water bath, then whipped until cool and folded with whipped cream.

The whipped eggs provide a mild custard flavor along the lines of a conventional ice cream, while the whipped cream adds a fresh dairy flavor and richness. Together, they produce a texture so light that no additional churning is required, in a low-moisture format that resists ice-crystal formation.

A stemmed dish of vanilla no-churn ice cream, topped with rainbow sprinkles

As excited as I was about those results, the first question from almost everyone was: What about chocolate?!

While the answer might seem a simple matter of whisking some cocoa powder into that vanilla base, the reality is a little more complex. Whether natural (acidic) or Dutch (alkaline), cocoa powder is relatively high in fiber and starch, as well as saturated fat, properties that can produce some unexpected behaviors in frozen or liquid formulas.

The starchiness of even a high-fat cocoa makes it rather absorbent, meaning that when it’s incorporated into the vanilla base it creates a thicker mixture that won’t aerate as well. In ice cream form, that can translate into a texture that feels dense and dry. Meanwhile, the added fat from cocoa butter tends to freeze rock-hard, making the ice cream difficult to scoop.

Knowing these behaviors means we can work around them, and the adjustments to the formula required to make a good no-churn chocolate ice cream are simple indeed. So long as we use the good stuff, anyway!

Dutch cocoa powder test

While this recipe will work well with both Dutch and natural cocoa powder styles, it’s important to avoid the low-fat brands commonly sold in supermarkets, as these will make an ice cream that’s starchy and bland. For more information on what to look for when shopping, as well as our favorite brands, see our guide to buying Dutch cocoa and our guide to natural cocoa.

To offset cocoa powder’s freezing point and the amount of liquid it absorbs, this formula uses slightly more sugar and cream, plus a generous splash of alcohol. Don’t worry—it won’t make this ice cream taste boozy, or prevent kids from enjoying it, too. It’s only enough extra liquid (two tablespoons) to balance the starchy cocoa without risking the ice-crystal formation that would result from adding water.

Plus, booze gives us a chance to layer in a bit of extra flavor and complexity. I like to use crème de cacao for an extra-chocolaty vibe, but complementary flavors like nuts (Frangelico, Nocino), coffee (Kahlúa, Tia Maria), and the caramel-like qualities in dark rum and bourbon can work well, too, especially with Dutch cocoa. Or try a contrasting note of citrus (Cointreau, Grand Marnier), cherry (Luxardo maraschino liqueur, kirsch), or herbs (sambuca, Cynar), which work particularly well with natural cocoa.

I combine the cream, cocoa, and spirit or liqueur with vanilla and a pinch of espresso powder, aromatics that will help expand the chocolate flavor regardless of which liqueur you choose.

before and after making the cocoa whipped cream

Whip everything together until it’s thick and relatively stiff, then cover and stash it in the fridge while the rest of the ice cream base is prepared.

To limit dirty dishes, I like to transfer the whipped cream to a two-quart baking dish that I can reuse to store the ice cream later on. This size and shape spreads the ice cream into a thin layer that freezes fast, with a nice long “runway” for scooping.

After refrigerating the cream, I prepare a water bath by filling a wide pot with a few inches of water. Next, I place a thick ring of foil in the bottom of the water bath.

foil booster for water bath

The ring acts as a booster seat, so that when I place my stand mixer bowl over the water, it will sit high, touching neither the water nor the pot itself. This allows steam to flow freely around the bowl, gently warming the eggs with indirect heat.

When the bowl touches the water, the bottom of the pot, or even the sides (thus forming a lid to the pot), the heat will be too strong and direct, leading to scrambled eggs. If you’re using a cheaper stand mixer that comes with a footed bowl, skip this setup and use a glass or ceramic bowl instead of the stand mixer bowl (in which case, it’s fine for the bowl to touch the sides of the pot).

cooking the eggs and brown sugar over a water bath

Once the water bath is set up, warm the whole eggs with brown sugar and salt to approximately 160°F (71°C), stirring and scraping constantly with a flexible spatula. In the bowl of a stand mixer, this should take only about five minutes; a slower timeline simply indicates a lack of steam, so adjust the heat as needed to move things along.

before and after whipping the eggs and sugar

When the egg mixture has reached about 160°F, transfer the bowl to a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment and whip on medium-high speed until it’s fluffy, pale, and relatively cool to the touch.

The timing of this phase will vary depending on the power of the mixer itself, but it will generally take from five to eight minutes. When the egg mixture has roughly quadrupled, turning thick, fluffy, and cool, remove the bowl of the stand mixer and incorporate the whipped cocoa cream by hand.

whisking and folding the whipped eggs and cream

I find this easiest with a large, open balloon whisk, but a gentle folding motion with a flexible spatula will work, as well. When the mixture is homogeneous, scrape it into the baking dish (or other container), then cover and freeze until firm enough to scoop.

This can take between six and eight hours, depending on the exact dimensions of the dish in question, as well as the specific freezer setting. Factoring in that substantial chunk of downtime, the total prep time here is still less than what’s required for traditional ice cream.

three scoops of chocolate ice cream

Even if you do have an ice cream machine, having a go-to recipe for no-churn ice cream can be handy if you don’t want to deal with the leftover egg whites involved in a traditional ice cream base, or when circumstances prevent the freezer insert in your machine from chilling in time for use. With results as rich, creamy, and chocolaty as these, a no-churn ice cream is certainly no downgrade—just a different approach to a classic dessert.

This post may contain links to Amazon or other partners; your purchases via these links can benefit Serious Eats. Read more about our affiliate linking policy.



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No-Churn Chocolate Ice Cream Recipe

No-Churn Chocolate Ice Cream Recipe

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik] Unlike no-churn recipes based on sweetened condensed milk, this chocolate ice cream starts with whole eggs, cooked briefly over a water bath. This gives the finished ice cream a rich, custard-like quality, along with a light and airy consistency. The chocolate flavor […]

Leah Chase (1923–2019), in Her Own Words

Leah Chase (1923–2019), in Her Own Words

[Photograph: AP Photo/Cheryl Gerber] Scrolling through Twitter a few days ago, I saw the news that Leah Chase, the chef and owner of Dooky Chase’s Restaurant in New Orleans, had died at the age of 96. Obituaries and tributes from publications nationwide are honoring her […]

26 Chicken Breast Recipes to Make You Like White Meat

26 Chicken Breast Recipes to Make You Like White Meat


20170524-chicken-breast-recipes-collage.jpg

[Photographs: Morgan Eisenberg, Vicky Wasik, J. Kenji López-Alt. Video: J. Kenji López-Alt]

I’ll be the first to admit that I’ve said some less-than-kind things about chicken breast in the past. I stand by a lot of them, too—chicken breast is often dry, bland, or just boring. But chicken breasts are also versatile, affordable, and incredibly popular, and when treated right they are far more delicious than I’ve sometimes given them credit for.

If you’re skeptical, we’ve got 26 recipes to prove just how tasty chicken breast can be. Think pan-roasted chicken with a bourbon-mustard pan sauce, the ultimate chicken salad, and fried chicken cutlets perfect for your next weeknight dinner (check out the video below for tips on how to turn breasts into cutlets).

Easy Pan-Roasted Chicken Breasts With White Wine and Fines Herbes Pan Sauce

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Pan-roasted chicken breasts make for a weeknight dinner that’s as elegant as it is easy. To cook the chicken all you have to do is sear the skin, flip the breasts over, and then finish in the oven until the meat hits 150°F. While the chicken rests you can make a pan sauce—here we use white wine and fines herbes.

Easy Pan-Roasted Chicken Breasts With White Wine and Fines Herbes Pan Sauce Recipe »

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Easy Pan-Roasted Chicken Breasts With Bourbon-Mustard Pan Sauce

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

This recipe uses the same technique for the chicken, but the sauce is flavored with bourbon, whole grain mustard, lemon juice, and parsley. The secret to getting a thick, glossy, restaurant-quality pan sauce at home is to fortify the chicken broth with powdered gelatin, which helps emulsify the butter and water.

Easy Pan-Roasted Chicken Breasts With Bourbon-Mustard Pan Sauce Recipe »

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The Best Juicy Grilled Boneless, Skinless Chicken Breasts

[Photograph: Joshua Bousel]

At their worst, grilled chicken breasts have a consistency somewhere between cardboard and shoe leather. But grill them properly and it’s a whole different story—these chicken breasts are juicy and flavorful. A big problem with grilling chicken breasts is their uneven size—pounding them to a uniform thickness makes them much easier to cook.

The Best Juicy Grilled Boneless, Skinless Chicken Breasts Recipe »

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5-Minute Grilled Chicken Cutlets With Rosemary, Garlic, and Lemon

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Chicken breasts have a lot of flavor if you grill them right, but that doesn’t mean adding a little more is a bad idea. Here we enhance the chicken with a loose rosemary, garlic, and lemon vinaigrette that we use as both a marinade and a sauce. Grill the chicken as soon as you coat it with the marinade so that it doesn’t break down and turn mushy.

5-Minute Grilled Chicken Cutlets With Rosemary, Garlic, and Lemon Recipe »

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Grilled Chicken and Cabbage Salad With Creamy Tahini Dressing

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Leftover grilled chicken doesn’t exactly reheat well, so you need to get creative with it. Massaging it with olive oil and lemon juice and mixing it with tahini is a great way to make it taste like new. This salad needs freshness and crunch, so we also mix in cabbage, red onion, and a couple of handfuls of fresh herbs.

Grilled Chicken and Cabbage Salad With Creamy Tahini Dressing Recipe »

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Sous Vide Chicken Breast

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

While you can cook tender chicken breast on the stove or grill, for the ultimate in juiciness you can’t beat sous vide—the precise level of temperature control allows for textures impossible with conventional cooking methods. You can finish the sous vide breast by searing it on the stove, or you can use it in the recipe below (which is my favorite way to use sous vide chicken breast).

Sous Vide Chicken Breast Recipe »

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The Best Classic Chicken Salad

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Cooked sous vide at 150°F, chicken breast takes on a juicy, slightly stringy texture perfect for chicken salad. Cooking sous vide also gives you the chance to add extra flavor—we like to throw lemon and tarragon into the cooking bag. As for the dressing, we stay classic with homemade mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, and aromatics.

The Best Classic Chicken Salad Recipe »

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Chicken Salad With Avocado, Corn, and Miso Dressing

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Here we use sous vide chicken breast to make a Japanese-inspired chicken salad dressed with miso paste, mirin, Japanese mustard, and shichimi togarashi. In addition to the dressing we mix in buttery avocado and nutty sautéed corn. Fun fact: you don’t actually need a skillet to brown and sweeten corn—you can do it in the microwave!

Chicken Salad With Avocado, Corn, and Miso Dressing Recipe »

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Hot and Numbing Sichuan Chicken Salad (Bang Bang Ji Si)

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Our version of “bang bang” chicken is decidedly less violent than the classic—thanks to the magic of sous vide the chicken is plenty of tender even without pounding it. We use the energy saved on the chicken to crush Sichuan peppercorns, garlic, sesame, and chili oil with a mortar and pestle to make the sauce.

Hot and Numbing Sichuan Chicken Salad (Bang Bang Ji Si) Recipe »

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Juicy and Tender Poached Chicken With Watercress and Miso Dressing

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

If you don’t have a sous vide circulator (or a beer cooler), poaching is your best bet for tender, gently-cooked chicken. While most poaching recipes have you start with simmering water, we prefer to start the meat in cold water and gradually bring it to temperature. Once poached, slice the breast and dress it with the watercress and miso vinaigrette.

Juicy and Tender Poached Chicken With Watercress and Miso Dressing Recipe »

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Easy Breaded Fried Chicken Cutlets

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

Breaded fried chicken cutlets might sound like a project, but this recipe is plenty easy for a weeknight. Start with chicken breasts cut and pounded into thin cutlets, dredge them in flour, then dip them in beaten eggs and coat with a mixture of panko and Parmesan before frying. You can cook the cutlets in vegetable oil, but clarified butter gives them a wonderfully rich, nutty flavor.

Easy Breaded Fried Chicken Cutlets Recipe »

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Chicken Piccata (Fried Chicken Cutlets With Lemon-Butter Pan Sauce)

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

If you’re not going to fry your chicken cutlets in clarified butter, the next best thing is to serve them with a buttery sauce. The sauce for chicken piccata fits the bill perfectly—we make it with white wine, capers, and plenty of butter. Simmer the sauce down just enough and it will take on a wonderfully creamy consistency. It’ll take some practice, but if it breaks you can always whisk in a splash of water to bring it back together.

Chicken Piccata (Fried Chicken Cutlets With Lemon-Butter Pan Sauce) Recipe »

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Chicken Katsu

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Our version of chicken katsu isn’t too different from our basic Western fried cutlets, but we salt the chicken and let it sit in the fridge for a few hours—so the cooked cutlets will retain more moisture—and we skip the Parmesan in the breading. Don’t forget to serve the chicken with plenty of tonkatsu sauce.

Chicken Katsu Recipe »

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Katsudon (Japanese Chicken or Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl)

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Whenever I make katsu I’m sure to fry up a couple of extra cutlets so that I can make katsudon the next day. The dish is made by simmering katsu with eggs in a soy-dashi broth and serving it all over rice. Soggy fried food might sound unappealing, but the breading soaks up tons of flavor from the broth.

Katsudon (Japanese Chicken or Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl) Recipe »

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Chicken Marsala With Mushrooms and Shallots

[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

This Italian-American classic starts with chicken breasts dredged lightly in flour and browned in a pan, which are then served with a pan sauce made with Marsala wine, sautéed mushrooms, shallots, and garlic. As with our earlier pan sauces, this one gets its glaze-like consistency from chicken stock fortified with powdered gelatin.

Chicken Marsala With Mushrooms and Shallots Recipe »

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Chorizo-Stuffed Chicken Breasts With Queso Sauce

[Photograph: Jennifer Olvera]

One of the best ways to make chicken breasts more interesting is to butterfly them and wrap them around flavorful fillings. In this queso fundido–inspired recipe that means a mixture of chorizo, jalapeño, and onion (plus a rich cheese sauce on top). Want some more ideas? Check out our variations stuffed with andouille and rice, fig and manchego, and mushroom duxelles.

Chorizo-Stuffed Chicken Breasts With Queso Sauce Recipe »

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Slow-Cooker Chicken Cordon Bleu Dip

[Photograph: Morgan Eisenberg]

Chicken cordon bleu is a relic of another culinary era, but here we give it new life as a party-friendly appetizer. Like the classic, this dip is made with chicken, Swiss cheese, and ham—the less traditional addition of cream cheese makes it more, well, dippable. Don’t be tempted to open the slow cooker early or else you risk drying out the chicken.

Slow-Cooker Chicken Cordon Bleu Dip Recipe »

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Peruvian-Style Grilled Chicken Sandwiches With Spicy Green Sauce

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

If you love Peruvian-style grilled chicken but all you’ve got is a package of chicken breasts, this is the sandwich for you. The breasts spend a little time in a flavorful marinade that includes a bunch of zippy garlic, earthy cumin, smoky paprika, and good grind of black pepper and then get thrown on the grill. When they’re done, they get stuffed in a bun with crisp lettuce, creamy avocado, and a healthy smear of that green sauce that everyone loves so much.

Peruvian-Style Grilled Chicken Sandwiches With Spicy Green Sauce Recipe »

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Homemade Chick-Fil-A Sandwiches

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

While we’d normally use thigh meat for fried chicken, Chick-Fil-A makes their iconic sandwiches with breasts. The meat comes out of the fryer remarkably moist because it’s brined for a full six hours, which makes it almost disconcertingly juicy. After the brine the chicken is ready to bread, fry, and serve on a buttered bun with pickle slices.

Homemade Chick-Fil-A Sandwiches Recipe »

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The Best Chicken Parmesan

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Chicken Parmesan is an Italian-American dish, but we give it a distinctly Southern touch by soaking the meat in a buttermilk brine. We coat the chicken in a mixture of homemade breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese before frying and finish with mozzarella, more Parm, and tomato sauce.

The Best Chicken Parmesan Recipe »

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Easy One-Pot Chicken Tinga (Spicy Mexican Shredded Chicken)

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

To make traditional chicken tinga you need to track down fresh Mexican chorizo, which isn’t always easy to do in the US. This recipe gets around that by omitting the chorizo and flavoring the chicken with browned vegetables, aromatics, and smoky chipotle chilies. While we’re bucking tradition, try adding a few teaspoons of fish sauce at the end to boost the savoriness.

Easy One-Pot Chicken Tinga (Spicy Mexican Shredded Chicken) Recipe »

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Chicken Vindaloo Burritos

[Photograph: Morgan Eisenberg]

“Fusion” is something of a dirty word in the culinary community, but this Indian-inspired burrito is delicious no matter what you call it. To make it, stuff a tortilla with chicken vindaloo, basmati rice, paneer, and fresh tomato and cilantro. Make a big batch—they freeze and reheat wonderfully.

Chicken Vindaloo Burritos Recipe »

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Sweet-and-Sour Grilled Chicken Skewers (Yakitori Nanbansu)

[Photographs: Vicky Wasik]

Nanbansu is a sweet and sour Japanese sauce made with made with soy sauce, vinegar, mirin, and sugar. While it’s often served alongside fried chicken, here it acts as an excellent marinade for yakitori (grilled chicken skewers).

Sweet-and-Sour Grilled Chicken Skewers (Yakitori Nanbansu) Recipe »

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Gong Bao Ji Ding (Sichuan Kung Pao Chicken)

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

To make this Sichuan kung pao chicken, we first marinate the chicken breast with salt, soy sauce, and cornstarch. The salt and soy sauce permeate the meat, and the cornstarch helps ensure it stays moist during cooking. Blooming chiles and Sichuan peppercorns in hot oil before adding the chicken gives the entire dish its signature ma-la (hot and numbing) effect.

Gong Bao Ji Ding (Sichuan Kung Pao Chicken) Recipe »

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Grilled Chicken and Peach Saltimbocca Skewers

[Photograph: Morgan Eisenberg]

Classic chicken saltimbocca is one of the great dishes, but you might not be quite as tempted to make it in the warmer months, when all you really want to do is barbecue and enjoy the weather. With that in mind, this recipe goes another direction. Cubes of chicken are marinated in a white wine mixture, then threaded onto skewers with peaches and prosciutto. The skewers are grilled until lightly charred and golden, then served with a dipping sauce made from the reduced marinade.

Grilled Chicken and Peach Saltimbocca Skewers Recipe »

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Grilled Tarragon-Mustard Chicken Skewers

[Photograph: Morgan Eisenberg]

These grilled chicken skewers only call for a few ingredients, but they pack a powerfully flavorful punch. The chicken is marinated in a mixture of Dijon mustard, lemon juice, honey, and tarragon. The honey chars and caramelizes on the grill, while the tarragon and lemon juice keep the chicken tasting fresh and bright.

Grilled Tarragon-Mustard Chicken Skewers Recipe »

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This post may contain links to Amazon or other partners; your purchases via these links can benefit Serious Eats. Read more about our affiliate linking policy.



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How to Season Carbon Steel Pans

How to Season Carbon Steel Pans

[Video: Serious Eats Video. Photographs: Vicky Wasik] Carbon steel pans don’t get half the love cast iron ones do, which is too bad since carbon steel can be just as useful in a home kitchen. Like cast iron, carbon steel has relatively poor heat conduction […]